The Tree

“The Trouble with Wilderness; or, Getting Back to the Wrong Nature” by William Cronon (William Cronon, ed., Uncommon Ground: Rethinking the Human Place in Nature, New York: W. W. Norton & Co., 1995, 69-90)

The tree in the city is in reality no less worthy of our wonder and respect, than the tree in an ancient forest. Both trees stand apart from us; both share our common world. The special power of the tree in the wilderness is to remind us of this fact. – William Cronon, ed., Uncommon Ground: Rethinking the Human Place in Nature

“The tree in the garden is in reality no less other, no less worthy of our wonder and respect, than the tree in an ancient forest that has never known an ax or a saw—even though the tree in the forest reflects a more intricate web of ecological relationships. The tree in the garden could easily have sprung from the same seed as the tree in the forest, and we can claim only its location and perhaps its form as our own. Both trees stand apart from us; both share our common world. The special power of the tree in the wilderness is to remind us of this fact. It can teach us to recognize the wildness we did not see in the tree we planted in our own backyard. By seeing the otherness in that which is most unfamiliar, we can learn to see it too in that which at first seemed merely ordinary. If wilderness can do this—if it can help us perceive and respect a nature we had forgotten to recognize as natural—then it will become part of the solution to our environmental dilemmas rather than part of the problem.” link

tree city

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4 Responses to The Tree

  1. Pingback: Tree Planting | lilianausvat

  2. Pingback: Forest and Environmental Protection | lilianausvat

  3. Jim in IA says:

    I thought you would find this tool about global forest change very interesting.
    http://jarphys.wordpress.com/2013/12/04/earth-global-forest-change-2000-2012/

  4. This juxtaposition of images and quotes is thought-provoking, and I think it encapsulates my philosophy toward urban wilderness: when humans perceive that natural systems and beings are living all around them, they’ll appreciate and protect what is natural and seems ‘wild’ even more.

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